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Lesson Plan -Questions Yourself -Tips for Writing an Effective Lesson Plan

Planning a Lesson

Lesson Plan  -Wise Teacher Asks 27  Logical Questions Before  Planning a New Lesson

 

A wise teacher prepares well his/her teaching topics. S/he evaluates his learners’ need well in advance. A wise educator always weighs each aspect of teaching learning process clearly before entering in the classroom/meeting students in the classroom. A wise educator asks him/herself following questions?

 

Rajeev Ranjan

Educationist

Preparing Lesson Plan for Effective Classroom Teaching

 

Lesson Plan : Importance and Benefits of an Effective Lesson Planning

Lesson Plan Question yourself before planning a lesson

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Writing skill lesson plan-teaching paragraph writing using jokes

Writing skill lesson plan-teaching paragraph writing through jokes

English Language:- Role of English Language in India

Planning a Lesson- English Language Teaching-Developing-Reading Skill with Special Objective to Focus on Grammar and Writing Skill

Planning a Lesson-English Language Teaching-Developing Writing Skill- Example

 

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Letter Writing Lesson Plan for English Language Teaching

Letter writing lesson plan for English Language Teaching

Rajeev Ranjan

Indian Educationist

Storytelling to Teach Language in the Classroom- Importance and Benefits

Planning a Lesson- English Language Teaching-Developing-Reading Skill with Special Objective to Focus on Grammar and Writing Skill

English language learning: Importance and benefits of practice and exposure

English Language:- Role of English Language in India

 

 

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Preparing Lesson Plan for Effective Classroom Teaching

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/planning-a-lesson

Nobody  is inferior and nobody is superior, one is just oneself. Educator identifies inherent capacity of students. He nurtures the inherent talent to become more efficient and more skilled;  to do something more innovative, more expressive, more novel for the welfare of the universe. A classroom consists of mix group of learners i.e. academically good, average and below average  in academic performance. A classroom consists of different types of learners i.e. visual, auditory, aesthetic so on and so forth. Educator nurtures everyone in the class. He tries to include something more to enhance the learning aptitude and attitude of the students, however to teach academically brilliant/good students of the class demands a little more effort from an educator.

    1. Educator should plan a lesson before the class. Advance planning of topic/lesson helps educator to create learning environment in the classroom. Teacher should use best available materials to cater the need of brilliant students of the class.
    2. Best material related to the concerned teaching topic
    3. Advanced questions for good students i.e. worksheet, practice paper, HOTS questions
    4. Extenteded challenging alternative activites for good students to enhance thinking skills
    5. Proper time management for differents tasks and activities
    6. Share instructions precisely to avoid confusion in the class

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/blooms-taxonomy-a-revolutionary-learning-approach

planning a lesson

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Planning a Lesson- English Language Teaching-Developing-Reading Skill with Special Objective to Focus on Grammar and Writing Skill

Educator prepares lesson plan according to nature of teaching topic, nature of students and nature of students’ learning. Sometimes, we plan a lesson for one period, sometimes we plan a lesson for special purpose, and sometimes we plan our lesson as Integrated Lesson Plan, where we focus on particular topic/concept. Educator decides accordingly. We will discuss different lesson plan format and some of sample lesson plan from different subject teachers. They think that they write the best lesson plan, however I think that there is always space, and opportunity for improvement. We are educator.   Educator may feel free/ open to accept or reject, partially accept or partially reject this lesson format/sample. Wise educator will draw the best from these lesson plan samples/improve it according to need. Let us add some valuable points and modify/customize according to need:-

Lesson Plan

Subject: English                                                                     Topic: Reading Skill

Lesson Name: Lost Spring                                                   Time: 35-40 Minutes

Class: Intermediate Level                                                     Date: ———————

General Objectives:

  • To enable the pupil to have global and local comprehension of the text
  • To help the students to understand the text and interpret the text in their own language

Specific Objectives:

  • To introduce new words from chapters
  • To teach grammar items (Tense)/ to make pupils notice tense form and understand the context of its use
  • To develop writing skill ( writing a Paragraph)

Outcome:  Students will be able to comprehend the text and at the end of the lesson/ they will be able to use English as well as write correct English

Introduction:

  • Singing a song (Jay Ho) from the film Slumdog Millionaire and relate this song to the story the Lost Spring or
  • Teacher can use MIME/ Mimicry to motivate the learners/create interest among the learners
  • Teacher can share an anecdote from real life about a person who becomes a very rich man by overcoming so many difficulties in his/her life or teacher will ask students to share similar story if they know
  • After writing the title (Lost Spring) on the blackboard, students will guess what can be the story? Or
  • Teacher will write “Food is more important for survival than an identity” ( Group Work) ( Speaking Activity) or
  • Teacher will ask students to do role play of street children, rag pickers, vegetable sellers

Presentation:

  • Teacher will ask students to read silently 2 paragraph of the story within a certain time ( 5-7 Minute).
  • Teacher will ask 2-3 students to speak about the text.
  • Teacher will explain the text by putting question before the students ( Elicitation Technique)
  • Teacher will present difficult words on the blackboard and explain its meaning with the help of students i.e. scrounging- to take sth without asking permission, mutters- to speak sth in a low voice, glibly- spoken in a smooth clever way but not seeming sincere and honest
  • Teacher will introduce pronunciation of some word and make them practice
  • Teacher will ask students to once again go through the text and identify the different tense used in the text i.e- why do you do this?, I ask sahib. Sahib left his home long away.  I like the game.

Sample of questions

  • Who is sahib?
  • What does he ask to the sahib?
  • Do rag pickers pick gold from garbage?
  • What is the meaning of “mutter”? Can you tell me antonyms/synonyms? What is it? A noun/pronoun / verb/adverb

Helping weak/reluctant learners:

Teacher will support them.

Teacher will encourage them to share his views in the class?

Conclusion:

  • Teacher will once again summarise the lesson of the day by giving main points of the story. Or
  • Teacher can ask factual questions i.e. main event, day, date, name of the characters to encourage students
  1. True /false question
  2. Multiple questions
  3. Fill in the blank
  • Teacher can ask students to frame questions of their own choice. In fact if pupils are able to frame a few questions, it means they also know the answer of their own questions.
  • Summarising can be done by students

Home Learning:  Teacher will ask students to write a paragraph about “Food is more important for survival than an identity”

Real Life Learning:  Make students aware about societal problems, their real cause and effect

Teaching Aids:  Power Point Presentation, Pictures, Drawings

Teaching Techniques: interactive, Elicitation, Group Work, Role Play

A teacher can create a number of activities to teach a Reading lesson. It depends on teachers’ expertise as well as the objectives of teaching. Different activities can be organised i.e. brainstorming, role play, mime, group work, pair work, changing prose into dialogue writing between two character, telephonic conversation etc according to pupils’ age and styles of learning.

Sample of teaching Word power  at random in a language class

Teacher can teach vocabulary in a context with the help of students according to their age, considering different learning style, by using elicitation techniques ————–if needs

 

It can be

  • Meaning of the word
  • Antonyms/Synonyms
  • Family of the word
  • Forming meaningful sentence
  • Grammar of the word
  • Pronunciation
  • Origin of the word

 

Suppose a word “inspection” appears in the text, at least 10-15 words can be taught by using this single word like

  • Identify the key word/part of this word
  • Spect- to see

http://ncert.nic.in/ncerts/l/lefl102.pdf

Rajeev Ranjan

Indian Educationist

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Planning a Lesson-English Language Teaching-Developing Writing Skill- Example

A well developed lesson plan is a road map of a wise educator. Educator’s expertise is reflected in his/her lesson plan. It is architecture of teacher’s expertise.

Educator prepares lesson plan according to nature of teaching topic, nature of students and nature of students’ learning. Sometimes, we plan a lesson for one period, sometimes we plan a lesson for special purpose, and sometimes we plan our lesson as Integrated Lesson Plan, where we focus on particular topic/concept. Educator decides accordingly. We will discuss different lesson plan format and some of sample lesson plan from different subject teachers. They think that they write the best lesson plan, however I think that there is always space, and opportunity for improvement. We are educator.   Educator may feel free/ open to accept or reject, partially accept or partially reject this lesson format/sample. Wise educator will draw the best from these lesson plan samples/improve it according to need. Let us add some valuable points and modify/customize according to need:-

When we closely monitor different teacher, different subject teacher, different school, state and nation’s lesson plan, we find same values, however writing style of lesson plan may differ from one culture to another culture and from one school to another school or from one group of schools to another group of schools. Effective learning is the soul nature of writing integrated lesson plan. Students’ learning is educator’s sole purpose. Students exist at the center in pedagogical perspectives. Proper planning, relevant activities, relevant presentations, relevant questions, relevant illustrations, integration of life skills and integration of technology help wise educator to impart quality education and effective learning in the classroom. 

Rajeev Ranjan

Indian Educationist

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Lesson Plan : Importance and Benefits of an Effective Lesson Planning

Learning is a complex phenomenon. Educators’ subject knowledge and their skills of handling different kinds of learners at different pace, in different society, state and nation make them a facilitator, a guide and torch bearer of educational world. Educators’ well thought planning and execution of planning maximize learning in the classroom. 

 A well developed lesson plan is a road map of a wise educator. Educator’s expertise is reflected in his/her lesson plan. It is architecture of teacher’s expertise.

 A wise teacher prepares well his/her teaching topics. S/he evaluates his learners’ need well in advance. A wise educator always weighs each aspect of teaching learning process clearly before entering in the classroom/meeting students in the classroom. A wise educator asks him/herself following questions?

Lesson planning depends on the teacher interest and expertise. It is observed that on same lesson plan format, same subject teacher adopts different teaching techniques to teach a particular topic. Individual teacher of same subject may design different activity, adopt different teaching styles and use different teaching aids. Planning a lesson is solely depending on an individual.

Educator needs to create learning interest during teaching. Expert teacher not only create learners’ interest but sustain learners’ learning interest throughout the lesson.  A well thought and well planned lesson maximize learning in the class. Teacher adopts policy of flexibility during the teaching. Sometimes a good teacher modifies his lesson plan on the actual observation of students’ interest and understanding during teaching. Ideas of teaching can be included during teaching process; however learners’ interest is always on high priority for a wise educator.

When we closely monitor different teacher, different subject teacher, different school, state and nation’s lesson plan, we find same values, however writing style of lesson plan may differ from one culture to another culture and from one school to another school or from one group of schools to another group of schools. Effective learning is the soul nature of writing integrated lesson plan. Students’ learning is educator’s sole purpose. Students exist at the centre in pedagogical perspectives. Proper planning, relevant activities, relevant presentations, relevant questions, relevant illustrations, integration of life skills and integration of technology help wise educator to impart quality education and effective learning in the classroom. 

Rajeev Ranjan

Web Reference:

http://rajeevelt.com/2017/12/27/lesson-plan-planning-english-math-science-social-teacher-rajeev/

http://rajeevelt.com/2017/12/27/lesson-plan-format-sample-english-rajeev-ranjan/

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/anecdotal-records-41622426

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/any-time-anywhere-learning-40864490

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/blooms-taxonomy-a-revolutionary-learning-approach

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https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/differentiated-learning-a-methodical-learning-approach

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/constructivism-a-methodical-learning-approach

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/habits-of-mind-art-de-costa

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/educational-awareness-campaign

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/self-directed-learning-a-learner-centered-approach

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/how-to-develop-note-making-skill

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/how-to-write-a-report-16510891

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/advertisement-ppt-14449281

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/vision-14435010

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https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/effect-of-yoga-and-meditation-to-heal-out-stress-of-teachers

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/hierarchy-8811591

https://www.slideshare.net/rajeevelt/humour-in-the-language-classroom

 

 

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Lesson Plan: Effective Lesson Planning-Effective Teaching

A well developed lesson plan is a road map of a wise educator. Educator’s expertise is reflected in his/her lesson plan. It is architecture of teacher’s expertise.

Below find the story —

A Coward

Guy de Maupassant

Society called him Handsome Signoles. His name was Viscount Gontran-Joseph de Signoles.

An orphan, and possessed of an adequate income, he cut a dash, as the saying is. He had a good figure and a good carriage, a sufficient flow of words to pass for wit, a certain natural grace, an air of nobility and pride, a gallant moustache and an eloquent eye, attributes which women like.

He was in demand in drawing-rooms, sought after for valses, and in men he inspired that smiling hostility which is reserved for vital and attractive rivals. He had been suspected of several love-affairs of a sort calculated to create a good opinion of a youngster. He lived a happy, care-free life, in the most complete well-being of body and mind. He was known to be a fine swordsman and a still finer shot with the pistol.

“When I come to fight a duel,” he would say, “I shall choose pistols. With that weapon, I’m sure of killing my man.”

One evening, he went to the theatre with two ladies, quite young, friends of his, whose husbands were also of the party, and after the performance he invited them to take ices at Tortoni’s.

They had been sitting there for a few minutes when he noticed a gentleman at a neighbouring table staring obstinately at one of the ladies of the party. She seemed embarrassed and ill at ease, and bent her head. At last she said to her husband:

“There’s a man staring at me. I don’t know him; do you?”

The husband, who had seen nothing, raised his eyes, but declared:

“No, not in the least.”

Half smiling, half in anger, she replied:

“It’s very annoying; the creature’s spoiling my ice.”

Her husband shrugged his shoulders.

“Deuce take him, don’t appear to notice it. If we had to deal with all the discourteous people one meets, we’d never have done with them.”

But the Viscount had risen abruptly. He could not permit this stranger to spoil an ice of his giving. It was to him that the insult was addressed, since it was at his invitation and on his account that his friends had come to the cafe. The affair was no business of anyone but himself.

He went up to the man and said:

“You have a way of looking at those ladies, sir, which I cannot stomach. Please be so good as to set a limit to your persistence.”

“You hold your tongue,” replied the other.

“Take care, sir,” retorted the Viscount, clenching his teeth;” you’ll force me to overstep the bounds of common politeness.”

The gentleman replied with a single word, a vile word which rang across the cafe from one end to the other, and, like the release of a spring, jerked every person present into an abrupt movement. All those with their backs towards him turned round, all the rest raised their heads; three waiters spun round on their heels like tops; the two ladies behind the counter started, then the whole upper half of their bodies twisted round, as though they were a couple of automata worked by the same handle.

There was a profound silence. Then suddenly a sharp noise resounded in the air. The Viscount had boxed his adversary’s ears. Every one rose to intervene. Cards were exchanged.

Back in his home, the Viscount walked for several minutes up and down his room with long quick strides. He was too excited to think. A solitary idea dominated his mind: “a duel”; but as yet the idea stirred in him no emotion of any kind. He had done what he was compelled to do; he had shown himself to be what he ought to be. People would talk of it, would approve of him, congratulate him. He repeated aloud, speaking as a man speaks in severe mental distress:

“What a hound the fellow is!”

Then he sat down and began to reflect. In the morning he must find seconds. Whom should he choose? He searched his mind for the most important and celebrated names of his acquaintance. At last he decided on the Marquis de la Tour-Noire and Colonel Bourdin, an aristocrat and a soldier; they would do excellently. Their names would look well in the papers. He realised that he was thirsty, and drank three glasses of water one after the other; then he began to walk up and down again. He felt full of energy. If he played the gallant, showed himself determined, insisted on the most strict and dangerous arrangements, demanded a serious duel, a thoroughly serious duel, a positively terrible duel, his adversary would probably retire an apologist.

He took up once more the card which he had taken from his pocket and thrown down upon the table, and read it again as he had read it before, in the cafe, at a glance, and in the cab, by the light of each gas-lamp, on his way home.

“Georges Lamil, 51 rue Moncey.” Nothing more.

He examined the grouped letters; they seemed to him mysterious, full of confused meaning. Georges Lamil? Who was this man? What did he do? Why had he looked at the woman in that way? Was it not revolting that a stranger, an unknown man, could thus disturb a man’s life, without warning, just because he chose to fix his insolent eyes upon a woman? Again the Viscount repeated aloud:

“What a hound!”

Then he remained standing stock-still, lost in thought, his eyes still fixed upon the card. A fury against this scrap of paper awoke in him, a fury of hatred in which was mingled a queer sensation of uneasiness. This sort of thing was so stupid! He took up an open knife which lay close at hand and thrust it through the middle of the printed name, as though he had stabbed a man.

So he must fight. Should he choose swords or pistols?–for he regarded himself as the insulted party. With swords there would be less risk, but with pistols there was a chance that his adversary might withdraw. It is very rare that a duel with swords is fatal, for mutual prudence is apt to restrain combatants from engaging at sufficiently close quarters for a point to penetrate deeply. With pistols he ran a grave risk of death; but he might also extricate himself from the affair with all the honours of the situation and without actually coming to a meeting.

“I must be firm,” he said. “He will take fright.”

The sound of his voice set him trembling, and he looked round. He felt very nervous. He drank another glass of water, then began to undress for bed.

As soon as he was in bed, he blew out the light and closed his eyes.

“I’ve the whole of to-morrow,” he thought, “in which to set my affairs in order. I’d better sleep now, so that I shall be quite calm.”

He was very warm in the blankets, but he could not manage to compose himself to sleep. He turned this way and that, lay for five minutes upon his back, turned on to his left side, then rolled over on to his right.

He was still thirsty. He got up to get a drink. A feeling of uneasiness crept over him:

“Is it possible that I’m afraid?”

Why did his heart beat madly at each familiar sound in his room? When the clock was about to strike, the faint squeak of the rising spring made him start; so shaken he was that for several seconds afterwards he had to open his mouth to get his breath.

He began to reason with himself on the possibility of his being afraid.

“Shall I be afraid?”

No, of course he would not be afraid, since he was resolved to see the matter through, and had duly made up his mind to fight and not to tremble. But he felt so profoundly distressed that he wondered:

“Can a man be afraid in spite of himself?”

He was attacked by this doubt, this uneasiness, this terror; suppose a force more powerful than himself, masterful, irresistible, overcame him, what would happen? Yes, what might not happen? Assuredly he would go to the place of the meeting, since he was quite ready to go. But supposing he trembled? Supposing he fainted? He thought of the scene, of his reputation, his good name.

There came upon him a strange need to get up and look at himself in the mirror. He relit his candle. When he saw his face reflected in the polished glass, he scarcely recognised it, it seemed to him as though he had never yet seen himself. His eyes looked to him enormous; and he was pale; yes, without doubt he was pale, very pale.

He remained standing in front of the mirror. He put out his tongue, as though to ascertain the state of his health, and abruptly the thought struck him like a bullet:

“The day after to-morrow, at this very hour, I may be dead.”

His heart began again its furious beating.

“The day after to-morrow, at this very hour, I may be dead. This person facing me, this me I see in the mirror, will be no more. Why, here I am, I look at myself, I feel myself alive, and in twenty-four hours I shall be lying in that bed, dead, my eyes closed, cold, inanimate, vanished.”

He turned back towards the bed, and distinctly saw himself lying on his back in the very sheets he had just left. He had the hollow face of a corpse, his hands had the slackness of hands that will never make another movement.

At that he was afraid of his bed, and, to get rid of the sight of it, went into the smoking-room. Mechanically he picked up a cigar, lit it, and began to walk up and down again. He was cold; he went to the bell to wake his valet; but he stopped, even as he raised his hand to the rope.

“He will see that I am afraid.”

He did not ring; he lit the fire. His hands shook a little, with a nervous tremor, whenever they touched anything. His brain whirled, his troubled thoughts became elusive, transitory, and gloomy; his mind suffered all the effects of intoxication, as though he were actually drunk.

Over and over again he thought:

“What shall I do? What is to become of me?”

His whole body trembled, seized with a jerky shuddering; he got up and, going to the window, drew back the curtains.

Dawn was at hand, a summer dawn. The rosy sky touched the town, its roofs and walls, with its own hue. A broad descending ray, like the caress of the rising sun, enveloped the awakened world; and with the light, hope–a gay, swift, fierce hope–filled the Viscount’s heart! Was he mad, that he had allowed himself to be struck down by fear, before anything was settled even, before his seconds had seen those of this Georges Lamil, before he knew whether he was going to fight?

He washed, dressed, and walked out with a firm step.

He repeated to himself, as he walked:

“I must be energetic, very energetic. I must prove that I am not afraid.”

His seconds, the Marquis and the Colonel, placed themselves at his disposal, and after hearty handshakes discussed the conditions.

“You are anxious for a serious duel? ” asked the Colonel.

“Yes, a very serious one,” replied the Viscount.

“You still insist on pistols?” said the Marquis.

“Yes.”

“You will leave us free to arrange the rest?”

In a dry, jerky voice the Viscount stated:

“Twenty paces; at the signal, raising the arm, and not lowering it. Exchange of shots till one is seriously wounded.”

“They are excellent conditions,” declared the Colonel in a tone of satisfaction. “You shoot well, you have every chance.”

They departed. The Viscount went home to wait for them. His agitation, momentarily quietened, was now growing minute by minute. He felt a strange shivering, a ceaseless vibration, down his arms, down his legs, in his chest; he could not keep still in one place, neither seated nor standing. There was not the least moistening of saliva in his mouth, and at every instant he made a violent movement of his tongue, as though to prevent it sticking to his palate.

He was eager to have breakfast, but could not eat. Then the idea came to him to drink in order to give himself courage, and he sent for a decanter of rum, of which he swallowed six liqueur glasses full one after the other.

A burning warmth flooded through his body, followed immediately by a sudden dizziness of the mind and spirit.

“Now I know what to do,” he thought. “Now it is all right.”

But by the end of an hour he had emptied the decanter, and his state of agitation had once more become intolerable. He was conscious of a wild need to roll on the ground, to scream, to bite. Night was falling.

The ringing of a bell gave him such a shock that he had not strength to rise and welcome his seconds.

He did not even dare to speak to them, to say “Good evening” to them, to utter a single word, for fear they guessed the whole thing by the alteration in his voice.

“Everything is arranged in accordance with the conditions you fixed,” observed the Colonel. “At first your adversary claimed the privileges of the insulted party, but he yielded almost at once, and has accepted everything. His seconds are two military men.”

“Thank you,” said the Viscount.

“Pardon us,” interposed the Marquis, “if we merely come in and leave again immediately, but we have a thousand things to see to. We must have a good doctor, since the combat is not to end until a serious wound is inflicted, and you know that pistol bullets are no laughing-matter. We must appoint the ground, near a house to which we may carry the wounded man if necessary, etc. In fact, we shall be occupied for two or three hours arranging all that there is to arrange.”

“Thank you,” said the Viscount a second time.

“You are all right?” asked the Colonel. “You are calm?”

“Yes, quite calm, thank you.”

The two men retired.

When he realised that he was once more alone, he thought that he was going mad. His servant had lit the lamps, and he sat down at the table to write letters. After tracing, at the head of a sheet: “This is my will,” he rose shivering and walked away, feeling incapable of connecting two ideas, of taking a resolution, of making any decision whatever.

So he was going to fight! He could no longer avoid it. Then what was the matter with him? He wished to fight, he had absolutely decided upon this plan of action and taken his resolve, and he now felt clearly, in spite of every effort of mind and forcing of will, that he could not retain even the strength necessary to get him to the place of meeting. He tried to picture the duel, his own attitude and the bearing of his adversary.

From time to time his teeth chattered in his mouth with a slight clicking noise. He tried to read, and took down Chateauvillard’s code of duelling. Then he wondered:

“Does my adversary go to shooting-galleries? Is he well known? Is he classified anywhere? How can I find out?”

He bethought himself of Baron Vaux’s book on marksmen with the pistol, and ran through it from end to end. Georges Lamil was not mentioned in it. Yet if the man were not a good shot, he would surely not have promptly agreed to that dangerous weapon and those fatal conditions?

He opened, in passing, a case by Gastinne Renette standing on a small table, and took out one of the pistols, then placed himself as though to shoot and raised his arm. But he was trembling from head to foot and the barrel moved in every direction.

At that, he said to himself:

“It’s impossible. I cannot fight in this state.”

He looked at the end of the barrel, at the little, black, deep hole that spits death; he thought of the disgrace, of the whispers at the club, of the laughter in drawing-rooms, of the contempt of women, of the allusions in the papers, of the insults which cowards would fling at him.

He was still looking at the weapon, and, raising the hammer, caught a glimpse of a cap gleaming beneath it like a tiny red flame. By good fortune or forgetfulness, the pistol had been left loaded. At the knowledge, he was filled with a confused inexplicable sense of joy.

If, when face to face with the other man, he did not show a proper gallantry and calm, he would be lost for ever. He would be sullied, branded with a mark of infamy, hounded out of society. And he would not be able to achieve that calm, that swaggering poise; he knew it, he felt it. Yet he was brave, since he wanted to fight I … He was brave, since….

The thought which hovered in him did not even fulfil itself in his mind; but, opening his mouth wide, he thrust in the barrel of his pistol with savage gesture until it reached his throat, and pressed on the trigger.

When his valet ran in, at the sound of the report, he found him lying dead upon his back. A shower of blood had splashed the white paper on the table, and made a great red mark beneath these four words:

“This is my will.”

Educator needs to create learning interest during teaching. Expert teacher not only create learners’ interest but sustain learners’ learning interest throughout the lesson.  A well thought and well planned lesson maximize learning in the class. Teacher adopts policy of flexibility during the teaching. Sometimes a good teacher modifies his lesson plan on the actual observation of students’ interest and understanding during teaching. Ideas of teaching can be included during teaching process; however learners’ interest is always on high priority for a wise educator.

Rajeev Ranjan

Indian Educationist